A complimentary video for you… 5 Keys for a Productive Garden

 

Are you inspired? Do you have a special “key” that has helped you in your gardening experience? Share your thoughts in the comments below…

And make sure to hit the “like” button to share this with your friends!

170 Comments

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  • Bob Wood

    Reply Reply July 4, 2013

    Good to see a young fellow so interested and committed to gardening. Wish I was like that when I was younger. Just goes to say “we get too soon old and to late smart.” At least that is true for me!

    • Paul

      Reply Reply July 5, 2013

      Hey Bob – Thanks for your kind words… though I’m sure there is much I could learn from you as well. Just remember that it’s never too late to start. ๐Ÿ˜‰

      • Claudia

        Reply Reply September 4, 2014

        The info u gave was very helpful thank u for all the tips may God bless ur endivers keep up the good works!

  • Agathe

    Reply Reply July 9, 2013

    hello, i would like to have this in german. it would be great, if possible! Many thanks, Agathe

    • Paul

      Reply Reply July 9, 2013

      Hi Agathe, I would love to have it translated into German but don’t have the resources to do that at the moment. If you know of anyone who would be interested in volunteering the time that would be wonderful! ๐Ÿ™‚

      • Dom

        Reply Reply September 26, 2014

        Never mind German, I would like it in book form.

      • Dom

        Reply Reply September 26, 2014

        Im not having much success, first of all I can only grow veg in a green house. I tried a PVC one, it had condensation in it and all my little shoots died, so I sent the green house back. Then I brought another sturdier green house, which was badly designed and just sent that back. Which is the best green house to have? plastic, or glass, or Aluminiuim?

        • Roger

          Reply Reply November 16, 2014

          Plastic would be best for a green house, look for a tube plastic. This is a dual layer plastic that you can get a small blowe ti inflate thus insulating it with ari, very efficient covering for any green house that must be heated by some form.

        • Paul

          Reply Reply November 18, 2014

          Hi Dom, Roger has a good point and I’d suggest going with plastic as well. Not every house has to be heated and if so you wouldn’t need the double layer of plastic. This would depend on how serious you are, where you live, and what you would like to do. We live in TN and grow straight through the winter under unheated plastic greenhouses.

  • Jane Grossman

    Reply Reply September 24, 2013

    Paul,
    Great, practical tips for a successful garden. Enjoyed it!
    And congratulations on your Garden Bloggers award!

    • Paul

      Reply Reply September 26, 2013

      Thanks so much Jane – I enjoyed getting to meet you at the conference! ๐Ÿ™‚

      • Margit Sepsi

        Reply Reply April 21, 2016

        Hello Paul, blessings from our Heavenly Father, I just remember you because I was watching the conference. You just got married to that beautiful lady in February????? Didn`t you ??? Thank you for Born to Grow page on Face Book. Check out my FB page : Sepsi Margit. At the moment I am in Romania to my mum`s house where I have a very big garden 25 acres,with lots of trees ,walnut trees.etc. Sad ,because my mum just past away . I want to keep that house because of that beautiful grden. I need help in setting up a bio gardening. Maranatha,get ready because Jesus is coming back very soon and we are going home…..Soon ,very soon we are looking forward to International Heaven`s Day, in a little while we are going home. I want to see Jesus. What about you ???

  • Yolanda Sullivan

    Reply Reply September 30, 2013

    Thank you for the tips. My husband started a garden for us, but I have yet to get in there and work it, I’m scare of bugs, so all I do is water it.
    I got tomatoes all types of chilies, cantaloupe, zucchinis, and, basil. Also, I’m not sure that he made it organic totally. He said he did. So, I’m going to learn from you. Thank you for the tips.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply March 20, 2014

      You are welcome Yolanda! Keep up the good work. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • joe

    Reply Reply March 20, 2014

    you are right on !!!!!!

  • Colleen Rittenour

    Reply Reply March 23, 2014

    Paul,

    Thank-you so much for the inspiration. On the fifth step of your 5 keys you mentioned that you would share two tips on feeding the soil. One was adding organic matter, but I didn’t pick up the second one. Did I miss it?

    Thank-you so much,

    Colleen

    • Paul

      Reply Reply June 24, 2014

      Hi Colleen – great question! The two tips were not necessarily specific for feeding the soil, but for keeping your soil healthy. The one like you mentioned was to add organic matter and the second one was to make sure to keep your soil loose so that air and water can flow freely through it. Thanks for asking!

  • Linda Skipper

    Reply Reply March 24, 2014

    Thanks you so much for the 5 steps, my husband built a 16×20 raised garden and steps you spoke we have done. I was so pleased, I know we were on the right track. I have signed up for your seminar on the 27th. God Bless you & you family.

  • Becky Carlson

    Reply Reply June 22, 2014

    Thank you! Will you be blogging or teaching a class on how to plant a Fall/Winter garden? If so, I would like info about when, please.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply June 24, 2014

      Absolutely Becky! I’ll keep you posted. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Gustavs Latgalis

    Reply Reply June 24, 2014

    Thank you so much for these 5 useful tips! Inspiring, I enjoyed them. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Blessings to your farm,
    Gustavs

    • Paul

      Reply Reply June 24, 2014

      You are welcome Gustavs! Glad they can be a blessing!

  • Dixie

    Reply Reply July 29, 2014

    I didn’t get the video 5 keys to a productive garden. There wasn’t anyplace to click to watch. Can someone help me out with how to watch it?

    • Paul

      Reply Reply July 30, 2014

      Hi Dixie – do you mind trying to refresh the page or load it in a different browser? Let me know if you are still having trouble and we can try loading it for you somewhere else. Thanks!

  • Jonnie

    Reply Reply August 21, 2014

    I really enjoyed watching the video. It has inspired me to try having a garden, even though I still have no yard, and live in crowded city. I’m going to do it with containers, and do a vertical garden, to be able to grow more than just a couple of things. The patio is 6×12, and has a 9 square foot HVAC, sitting at one corner. Until we get a house with a yard, I have been putting it off. Now I will do it this way, and take it with us when we move. There are times I regret moving out of Arkansas, because, I had a garden when I lived there. Keep encouraging people, from children to seniors. I believe everyone should have one. If they did, the would have less stress, and be a lot happier.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply August 25, 2014

      Yes yes Jonnie! Keep it up even in the city… that’s the spirit. Something is better than nothing and I totally agree with you that everyone should spend time in the garden!

  • Joy Jackson

    Reply Reply August 24, 2014

    Yes, the minerals that load gardens with nutrition that is like no other!
    Praise God for these! Very healing!!!!!!!
    Ohmyrem.ember777@gmail.com

    • Paul

      Reply Reply August 25, 2014

      Amen! Praise the Lord Joy!

  • Drew

    Reply Reply August 24, 2014

    Paul
    Fantastic presentation! It is good to hear that you have been instilled with the respect for God and courage to share it. The garden is a great place to discover some of the blessings that God has provided. I personally have been gardening since i was a child with my father. I found after marriage that i was in a slump and was wrapped up in television. My wife nudged me to get out and garden to work off the anxiety of the day in the field of Architecture. I have seriously worked at a garden for my little family for at least 13 years. Praise be to God that i delved into the gardening.
    This year has been bountiful and the garden still looks like a spring garden thanks to the mild temps and good moisture.

    Looking forward to your webinar.

    Drew

    • Paul

      Reply Reply August 25, 2014

      Wow Drew, that’s a beautiful testimony. And yes – there is so much to learn about our Creator through His creation. Thanks so much for sharing about your experience and I’m so glad to hear how well your garden is doing. I’m glad you’ll be joining us for the webinar!

  • Janet

    Reply Reply August 25, 2014

    We have been gardening for years, learn something new each year. The last couple years we have concentrated on mulch, practically no weeding, and fantastic bounty.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply August 25, 2014

      Wow Janet, that sounds wonderful! What kind of mulch do you use? I’d love to hear more about your experience with it. Keep up the good work!

  • Sunshine

    Reply Reply August 26, 2014

    Wonderful video and introduction to gardening. I am looking forward to the webinar. Thanks for such a lovely presentation.

  • E

    Reply Reply September 2, 2014

    What a joy to see a young man living in accordance to God’s plan for mankind “to dress it and to keep it.” If all mankind just heeded that simple Biblical teaching, there would be no wars, people would be far healthier, far happier. God’s blessings show in this young man. Short story–working in Iraq, I had a head injury and heavy exposure to toxins via “everything” (metals, plastics, etc) thrown into the nearby burn pits …which damaged my lungs, cardiovascular, and neurological systems. Doctors could not help and the meds they prescribed worsened my physical condition. I took myself off their prescriptions, was told about and began taking resveratrol (grape extract) and initially unable to walk more than 20 feet with 2 days recovery time to heal, began gardening. Slow, steady, significant healing progress, over 7 years. Not only do we eat much from what we grow, but some of the weeds are also heavily laden with nutrients, such as lambs quarters and dandelion greens. Many younger co-workers exposed to the same burn pit toxins are now dead from cancers. I am alive and can joyously garden for hours at a time. Only heat causes re-arranging of “outside” schedule. God gives us everything we need. All we need do is actively care for His creations and appreciate His blessings. This young man IS a wonderful example of being a blessing to humanity–sharing the knowledge of “feeding the soil” and reaping the blessings. Thank you for a fine video.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply September 29, 2014

      Thank you for your kind words E. It was a privilege to read your story – very touching. Keep up the good work and may God richly bless you!

  • rued dave soreno

    Reply Reply September 19, 2014

    i missed the opportunity,hope to avail next time. got read your positive feedback.

  • Estoria patton

    Reply Reply November 12, 2014

    I could not see your program on my Kindle Fire Tablet. I tried over and over again. Very disappointed.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply November 18, 2014

      Hi Estoria,

      I’m very sorry about this… do you mind trying it on a different computer? I’m not sure why it would be causing trouble. I do hope you can get it to play!

  • Kris

    Reply Reply November 16, 2014

    Hi Paul!
    I work in Fountainview Accademy In BC Canada on the farm. We grow organic carrots. I like your points:)
    I wiล‚ try to stay in touch.
    I am oryginaly from Poland so my eanglish Is not so great:)
    But i love What you do:)

    God bless you.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply November 18, 2014

      Thank you so much for your comment Kris! I love what you all are doing on the farm there at Fountain View. Even though I’ve never been there I’ve tasted some of your carrot juice which is excellent! Keep up the good work and thank you for your kind words and encouragement. Praise the Lord.

  • Rowena Steck

    Reply Reply November 17, 2014

    I have learned on our island, where the sandy soil is often blamed, to not plant without helping the soil first. I planted caliloo (spelling?) (greens common in Jamaica and somewhat here) two places and one prospered and the other didn’t. The prospering one had had kitchen garbage and manure buried in it. Rowena Steck

    • Paul

      Reply Reply November 18, 2014

      Thanks for sharing Rowena! It is so true. Building up your soil is such a foundation for having a healthy garden.

  • Amy

    Reply Reply March 29, 2015

    Hi Paul,
    Thanks for all your great tips! I am enjoying checking out all your videos and would love to come up and see your families garden sometime. I just thought I would share our experience with gardening that we had last year. My husband and I along with the help of my Mom, planted our first garden last year. My Mom has been doing a garden for a few years now but she was doing it a bit different than we did. We built raised beds and purchased a truckload of organic garden soil from a nearby company that has wood chips, and all sorts of other things. We planted tomatoes, carrots, peppers, cherry tomatoes, some herbs, cream zippers and strawberries in our raised beds and my mom had green beans, corn, okra, squash, and more tomatoes & peppers in her garden which was just in the ground that was tilled up. She also already had blueberries & grapes planted in between her garden area and ours. We put wood chips on top of our soil in the raised beds after we planted our plants. We also added wood chips all around the raised beds and the blueberries & grapes and they all did wonderful! The areas that didn’t have the wood chips did not do as well. The plants were much healthier and the food seemed to have excellent flavor. I’m not sure if it was all because of the wood chips or if it had to do with our raised beds having all organic garden soil. Either way, it was great! We are looking forward to doing it all again this year. I hope you guys have a very blessed year as well and look forward to more info from your site.

    Blessings!
    Amy

    • Paul

      Reply Reply March 30, 2015

      Hi Amy,

      Thanks so much for sharing! I love hearing about your garden and would love to have you all come by and visit sometime. That’s great to hear about your experience using the wood chips. Mulch like that can definitely be a blessing. We’ve seen it work well in our flower beds. I haven’t actually tried the wood mulch in our vegetable garden yet – but would love to. And yes, the healthy plants and great flavor could definitely be due at least in part to the mulch. It’s probably a combination of both though – the good organic garden soil, plus the mulch on top.

      Keep up the good work! It’s a blessing to hear from you about your experience!
      Paul

  • Marian

    Reply Reply April 11, 2015

    Hi Paul,
    I can’t access the video…it may be outdated because I didn’t check my inbox since you sent me the link until now…I am very busy with gardening.Could you please send me the link again?Also,I am very interested in how to get rid of pesticides…Recently I had problems with the crickets eating my seedlings…for lack of a better alternative, I used an insecticide.Thank you for sharing your experience!God bless you!

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 13, 2015

      Hi Marian – thanks for your note. Please make sure that Flash Player is up to date on your computer and maybe try it in a different browser. I know the video is up and running for others! Thanks and sorry for the trouble!

  • Billie

    Reply Reply April 12, 2015

    I am blessed by listening to you, keep up your good attitude and works for us ‘hobby’ gardeners! I have learned a lot about gardening through your seminars, etc. and appreciate your willingness to SHARE with all of us listeners, as we struggle to do our best with our gardens. THANK YOU very much, may you continue your good works and words!!!

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 13, 2015

      Thank you for your kind words and encouragement Billie – I really appreciate it! And keep up the good work!

  • Bette

    Reply Reply April 12, 2015

    Thank you for some nice ideas! I plan to scratch my soil much earlier, and to emphasize GMO-free over cost. I have had my whole yard as a small plot garden in sandy loam for a few decades, and change or add something small each year. Looked more into permaculture, and have mulched with 4 layers of newspaper under grass clippings but can’t do wood chips with my builder husband concerned about termites or carpenter ants. Recently saw a neat idea to use compost bins like raised beds that give off enough heat to keep seedling trays warm and also the greenhouse. My greenhouses are large pots covered with tomato cage and double wall of contractor trash bags.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 13, 2015

      Hi Bette – thanks for your note! Yes… getting those weeds early like that can save a LOT of time for sure. Reminds me I need to go do it in my garden soon here. And I love the innovation. I’d love to hear how your compost bins work for you if you try that out!

  • Patty

    Reply Reply May 18, 2015

    Good presentation, short and basic with good tips and inspiration, I want to be more committed!

    • Paul

      Reply Reply May 22, 2015

      Go for it Patty!

  • Billie Fletcher Meyers

    Reply Reply May 20, 2015

    Dear Paul,
    So simple almost hard to believe. We struggle in Ok to have a productive garden because our NW part of state is usually very dry and hot. Last year we started the mulch and wood chips it has made a great difference but because the cedar wood chips were fresh even though we layered them on top it robbed the soil of nitrogen. This year is better because we have had some wonderful rains. Billie

    • Paul

      Reply Reply May 22, 2015

      Hi BIllie,

      Sorry to hear about the woodchips robbing your nitrogen! I’m glad it’s working better for you now. Keep me posted on how your garden comes!

  • Patty

    Reply Reply May 20, 2015

    Good info-focused and instructive and inspiring. I see that I need more commitment and time management so this key impacts your whole lifestyle sorta….

    • Paul

      Reply Reply May 22, 2015

      Absolutely Patty. I like to encourage people to make gardening part of their lifestyle. Integrate it into your life – it is such a blessing!

  • Christine

    Reply Reply May 28, 2015

    Thanks so much! We have a small group meeting weekly and wanting to do gardening so this is JUST THE THING! Blessings to you and look forward to more! I have started mine garden here in south Tx.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply May 29, 2015

      Wow Christine! I’m so glad it could be a blessing. Keep up the good work with your little gardening group. I love it!

  • jan nelson

    Reply Reply August 13, 2015

    Hi, Didn’t know if you could help me find a professional farmer to live on my ranch that is a organic farm to develope the market plan with the growing and production of food. East of Temecula California at 4,000 foot elevation. There are orchards of variety of fruits/nuts/vineyards and super large greenhouse. you can contact me by phone 760-8081434.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply August 13, 2015

      Hi Jan,

      Thanks so much for your note. Unfortunately I don’t know of anyone at the moment. There are more and more people wanting something like this. Thanks for checking in though!

  • Steve Dragoo

    Reply Reply September 2, 2015

    Hey Paul – thanks for the good info. What you presented was a clear pathway better than most anything else I have watched or read. .Keep the Faith! Steve

    • Paul

      Reply Reply September 3, 2015

      Thank you for your kind words Steve! I’m glad it was a blessing!

  • Jonnie

    Reply Reply October 27, 2015

    I enjoyed, and agreed with what you said. Curiosity is killing me. How do you grow plants, that do better in direct sunlight, in a hoop house? It looks like it would filter the sunlight. I ask because, my medications have warnings to stay out of direct sunlight, and I am considering purchasing a hoop house, so that I can grow my garden. How hot does one get, and can they be used during the harsh winters?

    • Paul

      Reply Reply November 6, 2015

      Hey Jonnie,
      Great question! Well, first of all – a hoop house simply has one layer of plastic over it so it still gets what we would consider as direct sunlight. You could put a shade cloth over it too which would filter the sunlight more. Now, even with the plastic the sun is slightly filtered but I’m not sure how it would be considered when it comes to your medications. I hope you can get something that works! There’s nothing like working out in the soil. And yes, they can get fairly warm inside. Even when it’s freezing outside on a sunny day it can get up to 50-70 degrees F inside. And they can definitely be used even in harsh winters. Now depending on how much snow you get it could be a little more complicated as you’ll need to keep the snow shoveled away from it. Hope this helps!

  • Joseph

    Reply Reply November 6, 2015

    I’m presently in the military, serving in Oman and, God willing, I’m
    planning to start a small farm on a small acreage somewhere in
    North America when my present term of service ends.
    Your great enthusiasm and equally great information that is
    wonderfully presented in a simple manner which makes everything
    easy to understand and replicate is nothing short of wonderful and
    a great blessing from God.
    Thank you so very, very much and may God bless you and your
    family very abundantly!

    • Paul

      Reply Reply November 6, 2015

      Thank you for your kind comment Joseph. And thank you for your service. Praise the Lord. I’m glad the training and tips can be a blessing!

  • Vernon

    Reply Reply November 29, 2015

    Hay Paul,

    What a great start to your new “Born to Grow University”! I have just purchased 5 acres here in TN, but there are a lot trees that have to be cleared before I can have space for a garden. I have been thinking about container gardens for a start, but with so many trees, I am concerned about enough sun light for a good crop. I’ve had some trees removed for my cabin space, but need a lot more removed before I actually have room for a good garden. Glad your sharing your tips with us! Keep up the good work.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 6, 2016

      Hey Vernon,
      So sorry I missed your comment earlier. Thank you for the encouragement and keep up the good work on your garden! Let me know how it comes this season. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Nancy

    Reply Reply March 29, 2016

    Thanks Paul,
    Nice video, information and encouragement! This will be our 6th year on this property. Previous owners said it was impossible to grow anything here, tested the soil and it came up 0 for everything! It’s been a struggle but persevering in building up the soil like you talked about and looking forward to what the results will be this year. It is an activity full of life lessons to be sure! Last year the strawberries were indescribably amazingly delicious – the deer thought so too and ate all of our organic plants… including the savoy cabbages and green beans. I do wish I could follow your advice to keep it small… sigh.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 6, 2016

      Hi Nancy,
      You are welcome! So glad it could be a blessing. I’m so sorry to hear about your soil. Keep up the good work with building it up. Perseverance goes a long way! Let me know how the garden comes this year and http://www.deerbusters.com has some affordable fencing we’ve found very effective against deer. Hope this helps!

  • Jeanne Brower

    Reply Reply April 18, 2016

    It sounds like fun but I don’t know to do all these things without a greenhouse.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 20, 2016

      Hi Jeanne,
      It can be a challenge to grow outside if you live in a harsh / cold climate, but the same principles apply whether you are growing in a greenhouse or outside. There are also many ways in which you can protect plants outside without a greenhouse or hoop house, with minimal cost.
      Thanks for your comment, we’d love to help!

  • Mayra Cruz

    Reply Reply April 19, 2016

    Hello Paul!- This is Mayra Cruz. I cannot access my old email account and I am trying to contact you through here to see if you will be able to help us with our next health class in Linden, TN in the month of May. We would love to have you or your dad sharing your gardening concepts with our class! My e-mail address is: mcrpab7@gmail.com. Thanks and many blessings!!!

  • SUSAN SCOBLE

    Reply Reply April 19, 2016

    Beautifully done Paul, and what a blessing. Thank you so much.
    I first saw your lovely farm and family in the video “Urban Danger”

    God Bless You and Maranatha

    Susan

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 20, 2016

      You’re very welcome Susan! And thank you for the encouragement. ๐Ÿ™‚

  • gayle

    Reply Reply April 26, 2016

    inspired with your video Paul.!
    i’m an agriculture student at Mountain View College, almost to graduate. But i stop studying my course 2 years ago already. i have a lot of fears and i don’t have confidence, because every time i do gardening, most of my plants die. it seems that agriculture is not my field perhaps i made a wrong decision when i enrolled to college. but i really love gardening. after i stop my schooling, i join missionary work as a Bible Worker assigned in Metro Manila for almost 2 years. i enjoy working with Lord. but the more i engage this kind of work, the more also i appreciate my course. Soul winning is just like gardening.
    angd watching your video, inspired me to go back.
    thank you.

    • Paul

      Reply Reply April 26, 2016

      Praise the Lord Gayle! I’m so glad it was an encouragement. Keep up the good work!

  • Kathryn Yvonne

    Reply Reply June 16, 2016

    I loved this 5 Keys presentation even though I am not physically able to garden myself. My daughter lives in Tehachapi Valley between Mojave and Bakersfield in So. California at 4500 feet. She is a ‘kept’ wife so has time to commit to serious gardening at least 6 days a week (and she has the tan to prove it). She was determined to do organic gardening so she could provide almost 100% of her family’s fresh and preserved food year around — The soil needed a lot of amendments. She first established a vegetarian compost pile which the mice and voles thought was a picnic, so she purchased a composter which is sealed. Then she began using the “Back To Eden” method of disturbing the soil as little as possible, topping it with mulch, inserting her seed into the soil, and topping it all off with ‘whole-tree’ wood chips — not landscaping bark chips. This has worked very well for her for several years with the least amount of weeds. This year, though, has been different for her, because living close to the mountains has brought a lot of weeds. She wanted to aerate her soil, so she sent away for a lot of Night Crawler worms (they burrow more deeply than the others) and her semi-desert soil is just loamy, dark and beautiful now. The wood chips work like little sponges holding moisture from humidity and even arid desert air. The secret of using ‘whole-tree’ wood chips is to first feed the soil, plant, mulch, and apply the wood chips last. Do not till them into the soil for that robs the nitrogen and your crop will fail. If you have applied wood chips in that area before, just push some out of the way, poke your seed into the soil under the mulch and spread the remaining chips over the area again. If you need more chips, just add new chips to the top. Her husband found a source for good mulch and ‘whole-tree’ wood chips in Bakersfield, so he and his trailer keep her well supplied — she is gardening in three large beds on their property, and if watering is needed she uses their pure well water, but the chips mostly keep the soil damp without additional watering even during this drought — very good for a state that demands water rationing. Their raspberries, boyenberrys, black and strawberries are a bumper crop this year. You name it and they are growing it (except for the Macha and other strange crops you mentioned). She is considering purchasing the organic Medicinal Garden Kit from Food 4 Patriots, to start her own old fashioned treatments right from her herb garden. She also has cherry, apricot, peach, apple and nectarine trees that are very happy. The grape vines are growing across the edge of the long deck roof and are delicious if you can get to them before the birds do. Speaking of grapes, DO NOT mulch them or toss your grass clippings under them — they will get a fungus and not bear. Remember, they are native to the Middle East where it is dry and nobody mulches. Also if you just pile up the grass clippings, they will harbor a bumper crop of flies — we learned this when the neighbor donated theirs to our horse corral — horrible and the horses wont eat fly infested grass clippings. Thanks, Paul for your wonderful programs — since I can not put your advice to use, I forward all of them to several of my friends and relatives who have moved out of the city into rural areas and need gardening classes, ha! Keep up the good work and thanks alo for exercising your gifts and talents.

  • Mary Ann Matzer

    Reply Reply October 3, 2017

    Oh No! I forgot about the time difference. My mother has Alzheimer’s, I get a little off schedule at times,

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